7 Nov. WD Quiz & Team Meeting Schedule

Housekeeping

  • 1. Team meetings will be held face to face and in your classrooms at the time/dates assigned below.
  • 2. The Scene Analysis blog post that was due on Thursday, Nov 9 has been cancelled
  • 3. You are now required to write the rough draft of your podcast script into your Team Google Doc

Walking Dead Quiz

Please respond to the quiz below:

Revised Team Meeting Schedule

Due to the power outage on campus today, all meeting will be held on Nov 16 and the new times are posted below. All group meetings will be 10 minutes long and will be held in your classroom. Please make sure the rough draft of your podcast script is available in your Team Google Doc by 8:00 AM on the day your meeting is scheduled.

ENGL.F2 (Clough 131)


Date Time Team
Tues, Nov 14 9:30 Team One: Briana, Josh, Ashna, Katherine, & Samantha
Tues, Nov 14 9:55 Team Two: Kusona, Cami, David, Yotam, Morgan
Thursday, Nov 16 10:25 Team Three: Sahil, Jacob, Ben, Felipe, and Bianca
Thurs, Nov 16 9:30 Team Four: Shruthi, Sara, Kendall, Elena, Megan
Thurs, Nov 16 10:00 Team Five: AJ, Kristen, Zoe, Liya, Bruce

ENGL.N1 (Hall 106)


Date Time Team
Thurs, Nov 16 12:00-12:10 Team Six: Prashikh, Faith, Malek, Giba, & Miguel
Thurs, Nov 16 12:15-12:25 Team Seven: Ian, Michael, Patrick, Shiva, & Branden
Thurs, Nov 16 12:30-12:40 Team Eight: Noah, Peter, Seenam, Joseph, & Marisa
Thurs, Nov 16 12:45-12:55 Team Nine: Heather, Samwel, Saige, Robert, Kristen
Thurs, Nov 16 1:05:1:10 Team Ten: Gabriella, Joshua, Kaitlyn, Lewey, Anastacia

ENGL.D2 (Clough 127)


Date Time Team
Thurs, Nov 16 1:30-1:40 Team Eleven: Chaudhary, Jack, Alex, Ethan, Seth
Thurs, Nov 16 1:45-1:55 Team Twelve: Quentin, Ashley, Patrick, Dzmitry, Michelle
Thurs, Nov 16 2:00-2:10 Team Thirteen: Emma, Ryan, William, Camille, Zack
Thurs, Nov 16 2:15-2:25 Team Fourteen: Nicole, Gabby, David Saiontz, Pavan, Nish
Thurs, Nov 16 2:30-2:40 Team Fifteen: David Huberty, Davis, Jacob, Benjamin, Rohan

2 Nov. Podcast Rhetoric.

Part I. Remote Classroom Instructions

For full attendance and participation for 2 Nov 2017, please complete the following
  • 1. Watch Walking Dead, Ep. 3 “Tell it to the Frogs”
  • 2. Listen to a podcast of your choice: any podcast, any genre.
  • 3. Complete a rhetorical analysis of one element assigned to you of the podcast of your choice in your Team Google Doc.

Part II. Class Plan Video

The video covers the following topics:

Podcast Analysis

In today’s video I assess the podcast Radio Lab, ep.8 (Aug, 3 2017) according to the following:
  • 1. Audience: Why does the podcast hold my attention and keep me listening? Does the podcast cover a topic I am especially interested in and in a way that other news outlets or sources do not or cannot? Is the podcast something that my friends and I listen to? Does the podcast you chose provide a model for how to appeal to an audience?
  • 2. Structure: What is the overall structure of the podcast. What sorts of segments make up the overall podcast? How are those segments arranged? Do the hosts announce the transition from one segment to the next? Why is the overall structure effective? Does the podcast provide a structural model?
  • 3. Segments: What sorts of segments are used? Does the podcast provide a model for segment order?
  • 4. Audio: what audio cues are used in the podcast? Are the cues consistent throughout? Is the volume consistent across the whole podcast? Does the podcast provide a model for the types of audio cues? 
  • 5. Conclusion: How does the podcast concludes? Do hosts announce what to expect on the podcast to follow? Is there outgoing audio cues or music? Does the podcast provide a model for how to conclude? 

Part III: Rhetorical Analysis of Podcast

Your final project teams are listed below. For this assignment, click on your name/team link, which directed you to a Google Doc. Each of you need to analyze a podcast of your choice according to the prompts in the Doc.


ENGL.F2 ENGL.N1 ENGL.D2
1. Briana, Josh, Ashna, Katherine, & Samantha 6. Prashikh, Faith, Malek, Giba, & Miguel 11. Chaudhary, Jack, Alex, Ethan, Seth
2. Kusona, Cami, David, Yotam, Morgan 7. Ian, Michael, Patrick, Shiva, & Branden 12. Quentin, Ashley, Patrick, Dzmitry, Michelle
3. Sahil, Jacob, Ben, Felipe, and Bianca 8. Noah, Peter, Seenam, Joseph, & Marisa 13. Emma, Ryan, William, Camille, Zack
4. Shruthi, Sara, Kendall, Elena, Megan 9. Heather, Samwel, Saige, Robert, Kristen 14. Nicole, Gabby, David Saiontz, Pavan, Nish
5. AJ, Kristen, Zoe, Liya, Bruce 10. Gabriella, Joshua, Kaitlyn, Lewey, Anastacia 15. David Huberty, Davis, Jacob, Benjamin, Rohan

RQ: WD, Eps. 3 & 4

Directions

Keep the following questions in mind as you watch The Walking Dead, Ep. 3, “Tell it to the Frogs” & Ep. 4, “Vatos.” The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

Walking Dead, Ep. 3, “Tell it to the Frogs”

Why does “Tell it to the Frogs” open with Merle on the rooftop? What accounts for his turn from delirious chattering to savage act of will (sawing off his own arm)?

What do you make of the scene in which Lori, Carl, and Rick are reunited? Why do you think the show runners (or the comic creators, for that matter) chose to put the family drama at the center of the show?

Why do you think the gender politics are so explicit? Do you think the divisions and inequities around which Andrea and Ed fall out existed before the fall of civilization OR does the fall of civilization produce gender inequity? Does the show suggest that gender equality, such as it is, is a luxury that the survivors cannot afford?

When the men in the camp find the zombie eating the dead deer they beat the zombie to death. How does Darryl react to the way the men kill the zombie? How do Andrea and her sister react? Why do you think the men kill the zombie so savagely?

How does the sound editing add to the mood of episode throughout?

Why does Rick volunteer to go back into the city to rescue Merle? What do the rescuers find when they return to the rooftop where Merle was handcuffed?

Walking Dead, Ep. 4, “Vatos”

What did Andrea and Amy’s father teach them that they translate into survival skills?

Why or for whom is Jim digging graves at the beginning of the episode and how do the other survivors respond?

Why is it ironic that Shane tells Jim no one will hurt him as he puts him in arm lock and then ties him to a tree?

Who kidnaps Glen and how do Rick and the gang plan to get Glen back?

What secret are Guillermo and Felipe hiding? What is your assessment of Guillermo and Felipe’s ruse and how do the group of survivors in ATL compare to the group of survivors at the quarry?

Do the survivors navigate a changed urban landscape in a sustainable way? OR what are some benefits of the zombie apocalypse to both the environment and society? How could we produce the benefits to the environment and society portrayed (in part) in “Vatos,” but without the total collapse of civilization?

 

31 Oct. Zombie Oriented Ontology.

Happy Halloween!!

Part I. Remote Classroom Instructions

For full attendance and participation for 31 October 2017, please complete the following
  • 1. Read Jeffrey Cohen’s “Undead (A Zombie Oriented Ontology) and watch Walking Dead, Ep. 2
  • 2. Watch the video lecture below
  • 3. Complete your assigned portion of the Collaborative Invention Exercise in your team Google Doc

Part II. Class Plan Video

The video covers the following topics:
  • 1. Housekeeping:Submission Stuff
  • 2. Overview/explanation of Cohen’s Essay
  • 3. Brief application of Cohen’s ideas to Walking Dead
  • 4. Overview of what to expect for Thursday, Nov 2

Zombie Oriented Ontology and The Walking Dead

I review the answers to the following questions during the video overview of Cohen’s essay:
  • 1. What does Cohen say he thinks the ghost he saw in his dream wanted from him? OR, what is the “source of her wrath” (397)? What is your assessment of the “personal narrative” as an opening rhetorical gesture?
  • 2. What is speculative realism, also called object oriented philosophy? How are zombies, and not ghosts or vampires, ideal expressions of this sort of philosophy?
  • 3. What are some reasons Cohen gives for the zombie’s “recent ubiquity” (402-404)?
  • 4. How do zombies function as allegories for both “the dehumanized who return,” as well as the “dominating ethos” (405), which produces and profits from dehumanization? How do zombies perform, in Cohen’s formulation, “every signification of the word ‘consumer'” (405)?
  • 5. How do zombies challenge the idea that human bodies are subordinate to an idea of personhood or subjectivity? Or how does a show such as The Walking Dead, illustrate “the inhuman agency that resides in the pieces and substances that we totalize for a while into a body we call ours” (407)?
  • Application: So what? How/why do Cohen’s ideas help us to read the Walking Dead in general and in terms of our course theme?

Part III: Collaborative Invention Exercise

Your final project teams are listed below. For this assignment, click on your name/team link, which directed you to a Google Doc. Please note you have each been assigned a specific freewrite question that asks you to apply Cohen’s terms/insights to Ep. 2 of the Walking Dead.


ENGL.F2 ENGL.N1 ENGL.D2
1. Briana, Josh, Ashna, Katherine, & Samantha 6. Prashikh, Faith, Malek, Giba, & Miguel 11. Chaudhary, Jack, Alex, Ethan, Seth
2. Kusona, Cami, David, Yotam, Morgan 7. Ian, Michael, Patrick, Shiva, & Branden 12. Quentin, Ashley, Patrick, Dzmitry, Michelle
3. Sahil, Jacob, Ben, Felipe, and Bianca 8. Noah, Peter, Seenam, Joseph, & Marisa 13. Emma, Ryan, William, Camille, Zack
4. Shruthi, Sara, Kendall, Elena, Megan 9. Heather, Samwel, Saige, Robert, Kristen 14. Nicole, Gabby, David Saiontz, Pavan, Nish
5. AJ, Kristen, Zoe, Liya, Bruce 10. Gabriella, Joshua, Kaitlyn, Lewey, Anastacia 15. David Huberty, Davis, Jacob, Benjamin, Rohan

26 Oct. Podcast Rhetoric.

Part I. Remote Classroom Instructions

For full attendance and participation for 24 October 2017, please complete the following
  • 1. Upload Literary Analysis Essay to T-Square as .pdf or Word file by 5:00. Be sure to include a title.
  • 2. Spent 5-10 minutes today or in the next few days responding to the Reflection on Literary Analysis Essay prompts below
  • 3. During class today, pay close attention to Mr. Bennett’s talk. You will demonstrate the skills he shares with you in class, in process documents, and in the final podcast assignment.

Part II. Reflection Freewrite/Draft (Complete on your Own)

Take ten minutes and freewrite in response to at least four of the following prompts:
  • 1.What is your argument or purpose, and how did you make the argument or purpose visible in your Literary Analysis Essay?
  • 2. Who is the intended audience for your artifact, and why? How is your choice of audience reflected in your Literary Analysis Essay?
  • 3. What are the defining features of the genre or media that you are using in this project, and how do you make use of these features?
  • 4. If you had more time for revision, what would you change and why?
  • 5. Consider for the final draft: What choices will you make to revise this list into a 1-2 paragraphs for the final draft of the portfolio?

Part III. The Rhetoric of Podcasting

Please give Mr. Bennett your complete attention:
  • 1. Mr. Bennett is the Undergraduate Programming & Engagement Librarian and he hosts the podcast Lost in the Stacks
  • 2. Mr. Bennett will discuss with you topics such as structure, format, aesthetics, and a sound-editing demo to demonstrate “nonverbal” communication in podcasts
  • 3. As we move further along with the project, please remember that the GATech Comm Center will be happy to meet with you individually or in teams to discuss your Podcast drafts

RQ: Cohen & WD, Ep.2

Directions

Keep the following questions in mind as you read Undead (A Zombie Oriented Ontology)” and watch The Walking Dead, Ep. 2. The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

Undead (A Zombie Oriented Ontology)”

What does Cohen say he thinks the ghost he saw in his dream wanted from him? OR, what is the “source of her wrath” (397)?

Why does Cohen not tell the story of the ghost very often?

What is your assessment of the “personal narrative” as a opening rhetorical gesture?

What is “speculative realism,” also called “object oriented philosophy,” and why is Cohen interested in this vein of philosophy?

For Cohen, what does the term undead name? Why is that a useful term for him? Why is that a useful term for us?

Why is Cohen interested in tracing the move from ghosts to zombies? OR, what is the answer to his question: “What is at stake in this material turn, this movement from cognition to consumption, from subjectivity and personhood to mere corporality, the human as yet another object in an object filled world?” (399).

Cohen argues that ghosts offer a sort-of intellectual allure and vampires draw us in with their cosmopolitan eroticism, so why have we given them up for zombies instead? What do we desire when we dress up like zombies and watch zombie shows?

What sorts of jokes does the CDC have regarding the zombie apocalypse? Why can’t the CDC, or really institution for that matter, protect individuals and civilizations from zombie swarms?

Why does our culture reroute such monsters through Children’s literature?

What are some reasons Cohen gives for the zombie’s “recent ubiquity” (402-404)? For instance, what to do the Paleo and Zombie Diets have in common, and which is greener?

What does Cohen mean when he says, “Monsters gain power through their invitation to participate” (402)? How do zombies challenge this convention?

Where does the word zombie come from?

How does the word zombie and the things it names figure, “the return of the injustices we quietly practice against people we prefer to keep invisible” (404)? First, what are the “injustices…we prefer to keep invisible”? How do zombies “figure” those injustices?

How do zombies function as allegories for both “the dehumanized who return,” as well as the “dominating ethos” (405), which produces and profits from dehumanization? How do zombies perform, in Cohen’s formulation, “every signification of the word ‘consumer'” (405)?

Why is battling zombies a “wild liberation” (405)? From what are we liberated? Or, how is killing zombies en masse a rejection of “the perishable flesh we hide from ourselves…[an attempt to destroy]…our own thingly existence” (407)?

How do zombies challenge the idea that human brains control human bodies? Or how does a show such as The Walking Dead, illustrate “the inhuman agency that resides in the pieces and substances that we totalize for a while into a body we call ours” (407)?

What is the “environmental aesthetic of the undead” (409)?

Finally, what does Cohen mean by “Zombie Oriented Ontology” (409)?

Why does Cohen wish we could have zombies without the apocalypse that usually goes comes with them?

The Walking Dead, Ep. 2, “Guts”

What purpose does the red bucket serve in the opening sequence? Does it lead the audience where you expect it to?

What’s your assessment of Lori and Shane’s affair? What purpose does it serve? Like Rick’s uniform, do wedding rings still signify if the institution that authorizes them, i.e. marriage, has been destroyed with the rest of civilization?

The main action opens with a “top shot” of the street where the show left Rick hiding in the tank at the end of the last episode. What sorts of comparisons does the descending shot establish? How does the descending shot illustrate some of Cohen’s claims, i.e. a comparison between “a body we call ours” (407) and “the objectional status of the body as a heterogenerous concatenation of parts, working in harmonious relation, or exerting their own will, or entropically vanishing” (47)?

What advice does Glen give Rick to escape from the tank?

Why does Glen trust Rick? Is it Glen Rick trusts or the technology through which glen’s voice is transmitted?

What moments in ep. 2, “Guts,” best illustrate the “wild liberation” (Cohen 405) of killing zombies? From what else are the characters “liberated” in this episode? What are some beliefs or behaviors from which the characters cannot liberate themselves?

Why is Andrea so upset with Rick when they first meet?

Why set the first half of the second episode in a shopping mall?

Why do you think the show runners stage the racism and white supremacy so explicitly? OR, what do the low angle shots of Merle, first at 11:45 and again at 13:05-13:30(ish), suggest? Why frame Merle out against the Atlanta skyline?

Is the zombie apocalypse really a post-racial society as Rick suggests? OR, do the zombies, more so than the racially motivated violence on the rooftop, figure “the return of the injustices we quietly practice against people we prefer to keep invisible” (404)?

How and why do Rick and the rest of gang attempt to preserve William Dunlap’s humanity or personhood (approx. 25:00)? Are they successful? How does William Dunlap’s corpse figure life after death?

Why doesn’t T-Dog save Merle? Why does Rick leave the decision to save Merle up to T-Dog? What’s your assessment of Rick’s decision?

What sort of ecologies do the characters in The Walking Dead inhabit? Are the characters in The Walking Dead more environmentally friendly after the zombie apocalypse? Could we ever have, as Cohen suggests, zombies without the apocalypse that usually goes comes with them?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RQ: WD, Ep. 1

Directions

Keep the following questions in mind as you watch TheWalking Dead, Ep. 1, “Days Gone Bye.” The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

What happens in the “cold open”? What does the “cold open” establish?

Why does Rick identify himself as a policeman before we even know his name? Why confront Rick and the audience with a child zombie before anything else?

Why do you think Rick keeps his uniform on for the whole first season? If civilization has collapsed, does the uniform have any meaning?

What’s the difference between “men and women”? Why open with light switch discussion? How does technology establish the difference between men and women, between civilization and savagery?

Is the high-speed chase, and subsequent shoot out that lands Rick in the hospital, establish a point of comparison between life before the fall and life after?

How does the show figure the passage time, or rather how does Rick assesses how much time has passed when he wakes up in the hospital?

Compare Rick in his uniform to Rick in his hospital gown.

What tools does Rick use to make sense of and adapt to his changed environment?

How does the camera work communicate the scale of the disaster/infection/loss?

How do Morgan and his son, Dwain, tell the difference between zombies and people?

Does Rick give Morgan the gun knowing he will use it to kill his dead wife?

How does Rick promise to get in touch with Morgan?

Does the show equate Rick’s shooting of the half zombie lady with Morgan’s shooting of his wife?

Is The Walking Dead a southern story or just a story that happens to take place in Atlanta and south of Atlanta?

Who hears Rick on the CB? Where are they? Are you surprised?

How does Rick’s lone ride into the abandoned city and eventual clash with the zombie hoard provide a figure for our contemporary environmental predicament?

How does the show contrast Rick and the zombie hoard in downtown Atlanta?

24 Oct. Scene Analysis.

Part I. Remote Classroom Instructions

For full attendance and participation for 24 October 2017, please complete the following
  • 1. Watch Walking Dead, Ep. 1
  • 2. Watch the video lecture below
  • 3. Complete your assigned portion of the Group Sequence Analysis worksheet in your team Google Doc

Part II. Class Plan Video

The video covers the following topics:
  • 1. Housekeeping: Title your papers
  • 2. Model “Sequence Analysis” of Walking Dead, Ep. 1 cold open. A Sequence Analysis is a technique used to close read film/TV for theme and form (i.e.Composition, Sound, Photography, Editing, Audience Address, Acting Style, and/or Costumes)
  • 3. Final project teams and how to access/complete the Google Doc activity: collaborative Sequence Analysis.
  • 4. Overview Podcast assignment and what to expect from class, which is FACE TO FACE on Thursday, Oct 26

 

Part III: Collaborative Sequence Analysis

Your final project teams are listed below. For this assignment, click on your name/team link, which directed you to a Google Doc. Please note that the scene you have been assigned is listed at the top of the Doc. As specified in the Doc, only complete the portion of the Sequence Analysis assigned to you.


ENGL.F2 ENGL.N1 ENGL.D2
1. Briana, Josh, Ashna, Katherine, & Samantha 6. Prashikh, Faith, Malek, Giba, & Miguel 11. Chaudhary, Jack, Alex, Ethan, Seth
2. Kusona, Cami, David, Yotam, Morgan 7. Ian, Michael, Patrick, Shiva, & Branden 12. Quentin, Ashley, Patrick, Dzmitry, Michelle
3. Sahil, Jacob, Ben, Felipe, and Bianca 8. Noah, Peter, Seenam, Joseph, & Marisa 13. Emma, Ryan, William, Camille, Zack
4. Shruthi, Sara, Kendall, Elena, Megan 9. Heather, Samwel, Saige, Robert, Kristen 14. Nicole, Gabby, David Saiontz, Pavan, Nish
5. AJ, Kristen, Zoe, Liya, Bruce 10. Gabriella, Joshua, Kaitlyn, Lewey, Anastacia 15. David Huberty, Davis, Jacob, Benjamin, Rohan

Post 5: Podcast Group Script

Post as a .docx file to the course site a draft of your group script by 12:00 PM Monday, Nov 14. For full credit the script should contain the following:
  • 1. Script Tips
  • 2. 150 words: Introduction: speakers, guests, topic, purpose, and possibly ‘what to expect from the episode.’
  • 3. 500-1000 words: Description of evidence you plan to use, interview questions (if applicable), and draft of analysis/discussion in which the evidence will be embedded.  
  • 4. 150 words: conclusion. Does your podcast meet the goals you established for it.
  • 5. Include sound queues and changes, as well as draft of sources cited in style of your choice. May also want to include notes on what/how you plan to edit.
  • 6. Optional: Notes or questions on what/how you plan to for time and/or legibility.