28 Nov. Portfolio Workshop 1

Finding Common Errors

Housekeeping

  • 1. Nice work on the Literary Analysis Essays. If you have questions about your final grades or my feedback, read the comments in T-Square and then email me.
  • 2. Do you have any questions about the Podcast?
  • 3. If you need to meet with me, I will be available by appointment on Dec 7. Email me with a time that works, and I’ll put you down for a meeting.

Final Portfolio 

Reflective Introduction

The following is the checklist of requirements you need to fulfill for full credit on the Reflective Introduction Essay to be included in the Final Portfolio. Take a minute or Two and read through the checklist.

For full credit on the Final Portfolio, you need to compose a reflective, introductory essay of 1200-1800 words in which you draw out an argument from the projects you completed this semester, i.e. the artifacts you curated into your portfolio. A successful Reflective Introduction Essay will accomplish the following:
  • 1. Develop an argument about your intellectual growth as a communicator through the close analysis of artifacts in the portfolio. Make sure your Reflective Introduction is an essay and not a list in paragraph format.
  • 2. Show and tell readers how you met or attempted to meet the course outcomes/instructor’s goals as articulated on the syllabus and throughout the course.
  • 3. Reflect on your strength and weaknesses relative to the course goals/outcomes
  • 4. Describe the methods and modes that were the focus of your communicative work this semester.
  • 5. Articulate areas and strategies you would like to focus on for continued improvement.

Group Analysis: Reflective Introduction

Take 5-8 minutes and read the Reflective Introduction in Kim H.’s Portfolio. Afterward be prepared to discuss the following:
  • 1. Group One: What is the topic or unifying idea of the Introduction? What claims or sets of claims does the author make about that topic/unifying idea? What are some rhetorical gestures employed by the author?
  • 2. Group Two: Describe how the author has organized her paragraphs. Are some parts of the essay more successful than others, why or why not?
  • 3. Group Three: Describe the evidence and analysis in the essay. Does the evidence and analysis fully support and develop the claim, why or why not?
  • 4. Group Four: Describe the design/layout of the first page of this Portfolio. Does the author make efficient or innovative use of the affordances of the genre/tool. What’s your assessment of the page layout? For instance, what’s your assessment of the relationship between the written and visual text? What’s your assessment of paragraph structure?

Reflective Essay Freewrite

Freewrite for 5-8 minutes in response to each of the following prompts. Be prepared to discuss your response with the class after each:
  • 1. Rhetorical Awareness/Stance: From the beginning of the semester to this moment, how have you “grown as a communicator”?

    Your response to the question will form the topic and generate the claim of your reflection. To answer this question, think about the five major communicative modes in WOVEN–have you developed in any one of those areas more than others? Also, think about the artifacts you have produced this semester, what assignments or specific modes within assignments can you point to to show “development” over time? You may also want to frame your claim and subsequent essay in terms of one or more areas featured on the Common Feedback Chart.

  • 2. Draft an outline of the 4-6 paragraphs you imagine will follow from the claim you just generated.

    Organization: While the artifacts in the portfolio serve as evidence, remember, just like in the Literary Analysis Essay, you never want to lead with the evidence. Instead, you want to lead with claim and move from paragraph to paragraph in service of that claim.

  • 3. What artifacts do you plan to analyze to develop & support the claim you generated? (i.e. what final assignments best show your growth as a communicator?)

    Development of Ideas: How can you describe and analyze your own work the way we have described and analyzed images, poetry, essays, and film this semester? What key terms can you borrow from our analysis of design, rhetoric, fiction, and/or film to apply to your own artifacts?

For Thursday, Nov 30

Please be sure you can access the following materials for Thursday’s class:

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